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Hinkley: We will look after him

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 2: Matthew Broadbent of the Power poses for a portrait during the Port Adelaide Power team photo day at Alberton Oval on March 2, 2018 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media)
ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 2: Matthew Broadbent of the Power poses for a portrait during the Port Adelaide Power team photo day at Alberton Oval on March 2, 2018 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media)

PORT ADELAIDE senior coach Ken Hinkley says the club will do whatever it can to support Matthew Broadbent, who has taken indefinite leave from football.

Broadbent - who a month ago played his first game of AFL football in over two years - has been provided a leave of absence from the club to focus on his mental health and wellbeing.

“Matty (Broadbent) has been brave enough to stand up now and talk about some of his issues,” Hinkley said at a press conference on Thursday afternoon.

“We understand them and we understand the challenges with mental health.

“It doesn’t discriminate. There’s no right or wrong time to have those moments, and Brogsy has done some really great work over the last couple of years.

“He’s dealt with a fair bit, and he’s back playing football but it’s still a challenge for him.”

Hinkley says it is important for Broadbent and his family to be well supported, but also given the space and time they need.

“We will give him the time and give him the space that he needs now,” he said.

“We will respect the privacy he has asked for, and we will look after him.”

Hinkley says the industry has certainly taken significant strides forward in the attempt to understand mental health better, but believes there is still a long way to go.

“We understand that some of the issues forced on the players come from outside the football club,” he said.

“They are much harder for us to control and handle. We can understand and control what we can inside the club.

“But the world of social media and media, and everything else that goes on, it’s scrutinised within an inch of their lives.

“That’s what happens, and there are other things that go on in your life that just aren’t football related.”

Port’s senior coach says it is important players are brave enough to start talking about their mental health battles, and seek the help they need.

“We see it regularly. We’ve seen it regularly this year in the AFL - more than we’ve ever seen,” Hinkley said.

“It doesn’t discriminate and that is just what the world is today.

“It is a good thing that the players and the people involved in the competition are brave enough and able enough to step out and say, I just need some support right now.

“And that’s what we will do for Matty.”